Candice Van-Dyk – Timeless Descent

Candice Van-Dyk – Timeless Descent

Inspired by clean lines and simplicity, Timeless Descent is inspired by geometry and modernism whilst still maintaining class and timeless elegance. It was developed from the concept of a chandelier with a modern twist to transfer it into today’s contemporary environment. The chandelier concept makes it easily transferable into many different residential and commercial environments – from extreme modernism to classic design. The design encompassing a combination of timeless elegance whilst also embracing contemporary abstraction.

Black and white has been the base for this design – its classic and simplistic. “Black and White is timeless as it is definite…… It forms a never ending partnership that intersperses our style and taste with simplicity, classicism and often, an incisive edge” (Guild, 2013, p. 10) Black and white is an elegant combination and as photographer Ted Grant once said “When you photograph people in colour you photograph their clothes. But when you photograph people in black and white you photograph their soul’. (Guild, 2013, p. 10) The effect of the use of black and white together can be as conflicting as the colours themselves. It can be nostalgic and classic but just as easily contemporary and modern. The HPL Bianca Luna 180fx also embraces shades of Grey through the marble effect. Grey is a combination of black and white – it includes the forceful gravitas of black and the peace and purity of white.

The strong contrasts these colours provide help define the shape of this design. Due to the nature of the design and the layering of forms, it was important to select materials and colours that didn’t overpower and complicate the design – it is based on simplicity, contrasts and sophistication that can be transferable into different areas.

The layering of shapes helps transfers the viewer through the design from top to bottom. The design flows from one form to the next and which creates a cohesive feel. The repetition of forms creates a harmony and organised structure to the design.

Strong lines have been used to give this design a defined edge and provide a sense of structure to the design.

 

Craig Turvey

Craig Turvey

Wendy Tran – Crimson Summer

Wendy Tran – Crimson Summer

Light is essential in sustaining life for all living things. It is also associated with growth, warmth and hope.

The Crimson Summer design is inspired by the flowers of the Pohutukawa tree. In summer, along the coastline, this iconic New Zealand tree would produce a profusion of crimson blossoms. Clusters of wiry red stamens tipped in nectar would not only provide the native birdlife with a source of food, it also evokes memories of summer, family gatherings, beaches, barbeques and most of all happiness. All that is associated with light – life, growth, warmth and hope.

Like the Pohutukawa flower, the Crimson Summer light is made up of a cluster of stamens. Each stamen is recreated with a single Formica laminate, gently curved to replicate the unfurling of the flower, with the tip of each stamen embedded with an LED.

The intention of the Crimson Summer light is not only to provide a stylish, aesthetic source of light made from a versatile material, it also represents life, growth, warmth and hope. And to some, it will conjure up warm memories of summer spent on an NZ beach underneath a Pohutukawa tree.

Anne Thiermann – Splitting Pendant

Anne Thiermann – Splitting Pendant

Formica is durable, longlasting and protective. It takes on many forms.

This design explores the formal concept of a rock; a durable hard material encompassing and protecting the light inside. The rock cracking just enough to let the light out, achieving different light qualities as you move around the shell, always retaining a sense of intrigue, never giving away too much. Protecting, as if to keep the light.

The faceted ‘rock’ surfaces are emphasized with natural stone laminates on the outside. With varying Formica finishes used on a single facet to create the illusion of more facets than there actually are, to create depth in the design whilst simplifying the construction. The inside of the shell maximises light with the reflective quality of polished aluminium laminate.

Splitting pendant manifests light and Formica together. One strong and protective, the other elusive yet restrained, coming together to create an exciting display of form and texture. But the reward is light.

Aleisha Stanton – Contemporary Floor Mount Lamp

Aleisha Stanton – Contemporary Floor Mount Lamp

Flexibility – Formica is not just limited to benchtops and square forms; it is able to fold along curved surfaces also. I wanted to represent this in my design by having curves as a main design feature and to represent this in a contemporary form.

Function – The contrasts in this light fitting of vertical and horizontal surfaces, of different colours, patterns and finishes joining neatly together, and of form and function in the final product – this represents Formica’s fusion with creativity and adaptability in the industry.

Fashion – with an up to date swatch chart to choose from I was able to pick and match from a range of colours, patterns and finishes to assemble a contemporary combination that results in a fashionable outcome.

My Formica Formation design is about bringing these three aspects of flexibility, fusion and fashion into a light fitting that will extend the viewers’ ideas on Formica. I have created a light sculpture that is fascinating in its materials, manufacture and function. I wanted to design a light fitting that is contemporary to 2015 and adaptable to different surroundings, but which stands out as a unique custom design also.

Kirk Smith

Kirk Smith

Joy Smith

Joy Smith

Zee Shake-Lee – Talking to the moon

Zee Shake-Lee – Talking to the moon

I used to grow up with my grandparents and there was a concrete well at the courtyard of their old house. One day, out of curiosity, I stood on my tiptoes to find out what was inside. Surprisingly I saw myself in the sky. As a kid, I always wanted to touch the sky. Hence I instantaneously picked up some stones and threw them one by one into the well: to make ripples, to disrupt the sky and watch it forming back all over again. In that way, I felt like I could touch the sky. One night, my grandfather told me he kept the moon in the well. I doubted. So I ran to check if it was true. The moon was indeed kept inside. It was the first time I saw myself being so close to the moon. ‘How did you do that? Tell me!’, I asked excitedly.

Light is only appreciated in extreme darkness. The design, inspired by the solitude and the delicate yet compelling sense of moonlight, aims to capture the poetic moment of the night sky, reflecting the lights on the laminate material. Composed of reflective surface, the base of the lighting sculpture captures the lights and subtly delineates another world in the reflection. The design deliberately uses dark Basalt Slate to portray the darkness and mysterious quality. Symbolically, the material connects the sky and the ground through lights.

Grant Scurr

Grant Scurr

Simon Roper

Simon Roper